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GTC ON-DEMAND

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Abstract:

Genomics is on the verge of a breakthrough. With cost decreasing and accuracy increasing, the amount of data generated will make genomics accessible for a whole new generation of population level research. This talk will highlight the challenges faced in this emerging era of genetic data abundance and explore what accelerating workflows means for health outcomes.

Genomics is on the verge of a breakthrough. With cost decreasing and accuracy increasing, the amount of data generated will make genomics accessible for a whole new generation of population level research. This talk will highlight the challenges faced in this emerging era of genetic data abundance and explore what accelerating workflows means for health outcomes.

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Topics:
Science and Research
Type:
Talk
Event:
Supercomputing
Year:
2018
Session ID:
SC1840
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Abstract:
The Department of Energy (DOE) entered into a partnership with the National Cancer Institute (NCI) of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to accelerate cancer research. This "Cancer Moonshot" aims to tackle three main objectives: better understand the mechanisms of cancer, use large amounts of diverse medical data for predictive models, and enable precision medicine by providing guidance for treatment to individual patients. Leveraging the compute expertise of DOE in high performance computing (HPC) and new methods for deep learning in artificial intelligence, this HPC+AI approach aims to create a single scalable deep neural network code called CANDLE (CANcer Distributed Learning Environment) that will be used to address all three challenges. This talk aims to give an overview of the project and highlight how GPU accelerated systems in the DOE ecosystem, Summit and Sierra, have contributed to the project.
The Department of Energy (DOE) entered into a partnership with the National Cancer Institute (NCI) of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to accelerate cancer research. This "Cancer Moonshot" aims to tackle three main objectives: better understand the mechanisms of cancer, use large amounts of diverse medical data for predictive models, and enable precision medicine by providing guidance for treatment to individual patients. Leveraging the compute expertise of DOE in high performance computing (HPC) and new methods for deep learning in artificial intelligence, this HPC+AI approach aims to create a single scalable deep neural network code called CANDLE (CANcer Distributed Learning Environment) that will be used to address all three challenges. This talk aims to give an overview of the project and highlight how GPU accelerated systems in the DOE ecosystem, Summit and Sierra, have contributed to the project.  Back
 
Topics:
AI & Deep Learning Research, HPC and AI, Medical Imaging & Radiology
Type:
Talk
Event:
GTC Silicon Valley
Year:
2018
Session ID:
S81033
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Abstract:
Porting or developing applications for complex architecture such as hybrid GPUs can be difficult to get started. The initial steps or fraught with bugs and lack of familiarity with frameworks and hardware. This talk will discuss how a collaborative sprint can be used to accelerate the initial port to a new architecture. Collaborative hackathons have been successfully used as a training device for porting applications to OLCFs supercomputers like Titan and Summit Dev. These events give developers an opportunity to sprint through early porting pains and gain rapid familiarity with new computing tools, increasing the likelihood that the application will be ported successfully after the training event ends.
Porting or developing applications for complex architecture such as hybrid GPUs can be difficult to get started. The initial steps or fraught with bugs and lack of familiarity with frameworks and hardware. This talk will discuss how a collaborative sprint can be used to accelerate the initial port to a new architecture. Collaborative hackathons have been successfully used as a training device for porting applications to OLCFs supercomputers like Titan and Summit Dev. These events give developers an opportunity to sprint through early porting pains and gain rapid familiarity with new computing tools, increasing the likelihood that the application will be ported successfully after the training event ends.  Back
 
Topics:
HPC and Supercomputing
Type:
Talk
Event:
SIGGRAPH
Year:
2017
Session ID:
SC1741
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Abstract:
The Oak Ridge Leadership Computing facility will bring online a new GPU-based system, named Summit, in 2018 with full user operations beginning in 2019. This next generation in supercomputing architecture follows from Titan, our current GPU-accelerated system, but will be much more dense, with multiple GPUs per node and high memory capacity. Increasing density of nodes creates opportunities for data-intensive domains that have not previously considered HPC systems. We'll give details about Summit's design, highlight features of Power9 - Volta NVlink interconnect, and describe ongoing work at our center in preparation for Summit. Lastly, we'll share some lessons leaned, upcoming training events, and opportunities for early access.
The Oak Ridge Leadership Computing facility will bring online a new GPU-based system, named Summit, in 2018 with full user operations beginning in 2019. This next generation in supercomputing architecture follows from Titan, our current GPU-accelerated system, but will be much more dense, with multiple GPUs per node and high memory capacity. Increasing density of nodes creates opportunities for data-intensive domains that have not previously considered HPC systems. We'll give details about Summit's design, highlight features of Power9 - Volta NVlink interconnect, and describe ongoing work at our center in preparation for Summit. Lastly, we'll share some lessons leaned, upcoming training events, and opportunities for early access.  Back
 
Topics:
HPC and Supercomputing, Artificial Intelligence and Deep Learning, Healthcare and Life Sciences
Type:
Talk
Event:
GTC Silicon Valley
Year:
2017
Session ID:
S7642
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Abstract:

Emerging heterogeneous systems are opening up tons of programming opportunities. This panel will discuss the latest developments in accelerator programming where the programmers have a choice among OpenMP, OpenACC, CUDA and Kokkos for GPU programming. This panel will throw light on what would be the primary objective(s) for a choice of model, whether its availability across multiple platforms, its rich feature set or its applicability for a certain type of scientific code or compilers' stability or other factors. This will be an interactive Q/A session where participants can discuss their experiences with programming model experts and developers.

Emerging heterogeneous systems are opening up tons of programming opportunities. This panel will discuss the latest developments in accelerator programming where the programmers have a choice among OpenMP, OpenACC, CUDA and Kokkos for GPU programming. This panel will throw light on what would be the primary objective(s) for a choice of model, whether its availability across multiple platforms, its rich feature set or its applicability for a certain type of scientific code or compilers' stability or other factors. This will be an interactive Q/A session where participants can discuss their experiences with programming model experts and developers.

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Topics:
HPC and Supercomputing, Programming Languages
Type:
Panel
Event:
GTC Silicon Valley
Year:
2017
Session ID:
S7564
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Abstract:
This panel will discuss OpenACC as a directives-based programming model and the successes and challenges developers are experiencing. There will be discussion of how the developer communities are organizing to run GPU Hackathons and what it takes to be successful. We will also cover OpenACC 2.5 and the roadmap for the specification as well as for software tools that support this standard. This will be an interactive Q/A session where participants can discuss their experiences with OpenACC experts and developers. Special attention will be paid to parallel programming challenges educators and researchers face.
This panel will discuss OpenACC as a directives-based programming model and the successes and challenges developers are experiencing. There will be discussion of how the developer communities are organizing to run GPU Hackathons and what it takes to be successful. We will also cover OpenACC 2.5 and the roadmap for the specification as well as for software tools that support this standard. This will be an interactive Q/A session where participants can discuss their experiences with OpenACC experts and developers. Special attention will be paid to parallel programming challenges educators and researchers face.  Back
 
Topics:
OpenACC, Tools & Libraries
Type:
Talk
Event:
GTC Silicon Valley
Year:
2016
Session ID:
S6747
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Abstract:
This session will be around writing performance portable code. Best practices and recommendations from Oak Ridge Labs DOE staff. It will cover the CAAR program, what the labs are doing to help code migrate to machines like the upcoming Coral systems, and the advantages that the modern GPU architectures bring in terms of code simplification. The resources available to the domain scientist to ensure a smooth transition to this exciting architecture will be summarized, with suggested follow on activities. We are here to help!
This session will be around writing performance portable code. Best practices and recommendations from Oak Ridge Labs DOE staff. It will cover the CAAR program, what the labs are doing to help code migrate to machines like the upcoming Coral systems, and the advantages that the modern GPU architectures bring in terms of code simplification. The resources available to the domain scientist to ensure a smooth transition to this exciting architecture will be summarized, with suggested follow on activities. We are here to help!  Back
 
Topics:
OpenACC, Programming Languages, Tools & Libraries
Type:
Talk
Event:
GTC Silicon Valley
Year:
2016
Session ID:
S6748
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Abstract:

This panel will discuss the current state of GPU programming using compiler directives, such as OpenACC and OpenMP. This session is a forum for discussing both the successes and shortcomings of using compiler directives to program GPUs. The panel will include users, speakers from compiler and tools vendors, and representatives of open source efforts to support directives. Session participants are encouraged to participate in the discussions of this panel.

This panel will discuss the current state of GPU programming using compiler directives, such as OpenACC and OpenMP. This session is a forum for discussing both the successes and shortcomings of using compiler directives to program GPUs. The panel will include users, speakers from compiler and tools vendors, and representatives of open source efforts to support directives. Session participants are encouraged to participate in the discussions of this panel.

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Topics:
OpenACC, Tools & Libraries, Programming Languages, HPC and Supercomputing
Type:
Panel
Event:
GTC Silicon Valley
Year:
2015
Session ID:
S5198
Streaming:
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Abstract:

This session will showcase the results of the inaugural GPU Hackathon held at the Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility. The event hosted six teams paired with mentors over a week where applications where ported to GPUs using OpenACC directives. The talk will describe the progress of each team from beginning to end as well as details about their implementation. Best practices, lessons learned as well as anecdotes from mentors who participated in this training event will be shared.

This session will showcase the results of the inaugural GPU Hackathon held at the Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility. The event hosted six teams paired with mentors over a week where applications where ported to GPUs using OpenACC directives. The talk will describe the progress of each team from beginning to end as well as details about their implementation. Best practices, lessons learned as well as anecdotes from mentors who participated in this training event will be shared.

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Topics:
OpenACC, Programming Languages, HPC and Supercomputing
Type:
Talk
Event:
GTC Silicon Valley
Year:
2015
Session ID:
S5515
Streaming:
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Abstract:
Representatives from multiple organizations will discuss the current state and future directions for accelerated computing with compiler directives (OpenACC and OpenMP). Topics will include the status of OpenACC and OpenMP, commercial and freely available compilers, and user experiences.
Representatives from multiple organizations will discuss the current state and future directions for accelerated computing with compiler directives (OpenACC and OpenMP). Topics will include the status of OpenACC and OpenMP, commercial and freely available compilers, and user experiences.  Back
 
Topics:
Programming Languages
Type:
Panel
Event:
GTC Silicon Valley
Year:
2014
Session ID:
S4514
Streaming:
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Abstract:
The Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility (OLCF) has seen a steady growth of allocation requests specifically to use GPU accelerators on Titan. These early adopters have been successful in accelerating their applications and time to results. In this presentation, we will explore the growth and maturation of GPU use on Titan, with particular focus on important technical considerations. Early science users from academia and industry will share their motivation and experience transitioning to running on Titan and the impact of accelerators on their research. We will also discuss the future of OLCF, and forthcoming opportunities as we prepare for exascale in the next decade. Lastly an overview of OLCF user programs, with specific information on how to apply for allocations of computing, resources will be shared. This talk is part of the "Extreme-Scale Supercomputing with Titan Supercomputer" series chaired by Jack Wells, Director of Science, National Center for Computational Sciences, Oak Ridge National Laboratory.
The Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility (OLCF) has seen a steady growth of allocation requests specifically to use GPU accelerators on Titan. These early adopters have been successful in accelerating their applications and time to results. In this presentation, we will explore the growth and maturation of GPU use on Titan, with particular focus on important technical considerations. Early science users from academia and industry will share their motivation and experience transitioning to running on Titan and the impact of accelerators on their research. We will also discuss the future of OLCF, and forthcoming opportunities as we prepare for exascale in the next decade. Lastly an overview of OLCF user programs, with specific information on how to apply for allocations of computing, resources will be shared. This talk is part of the "Extreme-Scale Supercomputing with Titan Supercomputer" series chaired by Jack Wells, Director of Science, National Center for Computational Sciences, Oak Ridge National Laboratory.  Back
 
Topics:
HPC and Supercomputing
Type:
Talk
Event:
GTC Silicon Valley
Year:
2014
Session ID:
S4760
Streaming:
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Abstract:

This presentation will focus on early outcomes from Titan, the world''s fastest supercomputer. We will showcase results from the Center for Accelerated Application Readiness, or CAAR, where Titan''s manufacturer Cray, NVIDIA, and scientific computing experts at OLCF have collaborated to make several applications ready to use Titan''s GPU accelerators. This talk will also explore some best practices the CAAR team learned in the process of porting CPU-only applications to Titan''s GPU-accelerated architecture. Preliminary Early Science results from users running on Titan will be discussed, including, for example, applications in combustion for advanced engines, properties of magnetic materials for clean energy applications, and reactor modeling for today''s fleet of light-water reactors. Lastly, details about Titan system setup, OLCF resources, and how to apply for time on Titan''s 18,688 GPU accelerated nodes will be shared.

This presentation will focus on early outcomes from Titan, the world''s fastest supercomputer. We will showcase results from the Center for Accelerated Application Readiness, or CAAR, where Titan''s manufacturer Cray, NVIDIA, and scientific computing experts at OLCF have collaborated to make several applications ready to use Titan''s GPU accelerators. This talk will also explore some best practices the CAAR team learned in the process of porting CPU-only applications to Titan''s GPU-accelerated architecture. Preliminary Early Science results from users running on Titan will be discussed, including, for example, applications in combustion for advanced engines, properties of magnetic materials for clean energy applications, and reactor modeling for today''s fleet of light-water reactors. Lastly, details about Titan system setup, OLCF resources, and how to apply for time on Titan''s 18,688 GPU accelerated nodes will be shared.

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Topics:
HPC and Supercomputing
Type:
Talk
Event:
GTC Silicon Valley
Year:
2013
Session ID:
S3470
Streaming:
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